Menu
Cart 0

1911 HMV Gramophone Monarch Model V Model AJ013 by Old Modern Handicrafts

Old Modern Handicrafts

Item #:

Original Price: $107.28

  • $8334
  • Save $23


Inventory Status: Confirm item availablity via Email or Live Chat

Estimated Arrival: Between Nov 16 and Nov 28. * ETA for US orders only.

Shipping & Returns: Free Shipping!

1911 HMV Gramophone Monarch Model V Model AJ013 by Old Modern Handicrafts

This is a beautiful antique 1911 HMV Gramophone Monarch Model V Horn. HMV stands for “His Masters Voice”, is a trademark in the music business, and for many years was the name of a large record label. The name was coined in 1899 as the title of a painting of the dog Nipper listening to a wind-up gramophone. This model is for display ONLY and are handmade on a 1:1 scale using iron. Every detail such as the horn and storage box is carefully crafted just like a real one. A must have for the collector and enthusiast!

History: As the arcade phonograph business was growing in 1893, Edison was moving into the business of manufacturing records (either made in-house or sent to him by his regional phonograph operating companies), and he appeared to be planning to establish the phonograph as a home entertainment device. However, his progress was slowed considerably by the numerous lawsuits filed against him by competing inventors. In 1894 or 95, a German immigrant to the U.S. named Emile Berliner introduced a commercial version of the record player he had been developing since about 1887. The player used a disc instead of a cylinder (although Edison, Tainter, Cros, and others had anticipated the use of the disc). The record was made on a zinc disc coated with wax. Once a recording was carved into the wax, the disc was dipped in an acid solution, which ate away the disc under the groove and etched the recording into the surface of the zinc. Then, using an electroplating process, the zinc disc was turned into a stamper that could be used to produce the final recordings in large numbers by pressing the stamper into a ball of "Vulcanite" (hard rubber). He called it the "gramophone." Beside the advantages of mass production, gramophone records could produce a higher volume than the phonograph or graphophone records of the day. Thats because the volume of a record was directly related to how hard the tonearm was pressed into the groove--the harder you pressed, the more sound came out, but at some point the pressure damaged the recording. For a few years at least, before the phonograph was improved, the Berliner disc could produce a loud, room-filling sound. He set up a small recording studio in 1896 and by 1897 had developed an improved phonograph. The disc business was off and running. The Victor Talking Machine Company, formed in 1901, commercialized the gramophone based on Berliners patents, while in the U.K., the Gramophone Company had been formed in 1897 to do much the same thing. Berliner, a native German, also formed the Deutsche Grammofon company with his brother in 1898. By 1906, Victor Talking Machine Company was already a major force in the music industry when it introduced its first "Victrola," a disc player with the horn inside the cabinet instead of outside it. This and subsequent generations of Victrolas became top-sellers, and "Victrola" became a generic term for the record player in the U.S. The success of the disc was such that in 1912, Edison at last began offering disc-type phonographs and records for sale in recognition of the large number of disks on the market. Cylinder machines and records, however, were still produced until the demise of Edisons Entertainment Phonograph division in 1929.

Dimensions(in Inches): L: 14.5 W: 10 H 15.5

Weight: 2.3 lbs

Floor Mirror Gallery offers free shipping on all of our products!

We work very hard to ensure that we offer the absolute best prices online.  If you find another online store that offers a lower price then us within six months of your purchase date please let us know and we will refund your original payment for the difference.  We want you to feel confident that you are getting the absolute best price for the product you are ordering.  If you find that our own website has a lower price for the same item you have ordered within six months of your purchase date will refund the difference as well.

To request your partial refund simply e-mail us a link to the same product on our website, or on our competitors website within six months from the date of your order and we will process the credit accordingly.

Our 100% Price Guarantee has some limitations:

  • You must purchase the item from our website before requesting your Price Match Guarantee
  • Promotions such as rebates and buy one, get one free offers are not eligible
  • The item must be in stock on the competitors website
  • The competitor must be an online store, they may not have a retail location
  • The website can not be a discounter or auction website (ie; eBay, overstock, etc..)
  • The competitor must be an Authorized Retailer of the product in question
  • The Price Match Guarantee includes the item price and the shipping charges, it excludes sales tax
  • Certain brands are excluded: Brandt Works, Baxton Studios

1911 HMV Gramophone Monarch Model V Model AJ013 by Old Modern Handicrafts

This is a beautiful antique 1911 HMV Gramophone Monarch Model V Horn. HMV stands for “His Masters Voice”, is a trademark in the music business, and for many years was the name of a large record label. The name was coined in 1899 as the title of a painting of the dog Nipper listening to a wind-up gramophone. This model is for display ONLY and are handmade on a 1:1 scale using iron. Every detail such as the horn and storage box is carefully crafted just like a real one. A must have for the collector and enthusiast!

History: As the arcade phonograph business was growing in 1893, Edison was moving into the business of manufacturing records (either made in-house or sent to him by his regional phonograph operating companies), and he appeared to be planning to establish the phonograph as a home entertainment device. However, his progress was slowed considerably by the numerous lawsuits filed against him by competing inventors. In 1894 or 95, a German immigrant to the U.S. named Emile Berliner introduced a commercial version of the record player he had been developing since about 1887. The player used a disc instead of a cylinder (although Edison, Tainter, Cros, and others had anticipated the use of the disc). The record was made on a zinc disc coated with wax. Once a recording was carved into the wax, the disc was dipped in an acid solution, which ate away the disc under the groove and etched the recording into the surface of the zinc. Then, using an electroplating process, the zinc disc was turned into a stamper that could be used to produce the final recordings in large numbers by pressing the stamper into a ball of "Vulcanite" (hard rubber). He called it the "gramophone." Beside the advantages of mass production, gramophone records could produce a higher volume than the phonograph or graphophone records of the day. Thats because the volume of a record was directly related to how hard the tonearm was pressed into the groove--the harder you pressed, the more sound came out, but at some point the pressure damaged the recording. For a few years at least, before the phonograph was improved, the Berliner disc could produce a loud, room-filling sound. He set up a small recording studio in 1896 and by 1897 had developed an improved phonograph. The disc business was off and running. The Victor Talking Machine Company, formed in 1901, commercialized the gramophone based on Berliners patents, while in the U.K., the Gramophone Company had been formed in 1897 to do much the same thing. Berliner, a native German, also formed the Deutsche Grammofon company with his brother in 1898. By 1906, Victor Talking Machine Company was already a major force in the music industry when it introduced its first "Victrola," a disc player with the horn inside the cabinet instead of outside it. This and subsequent generations of Victrolas became top-sellers, and "Victrola" became a generic term for the record player in the U.S. The success of the disc was such that in 1912, Edison at last began offering disc-type phonographs and records for sale in recognition of the large number of disks on the market. Cylinder machines and records, however, were still produced until the demise of Edisons Entertainment Phonograph division in 1929.

Dimensions(in Inches): L: 14.5 W: 10 H 15.5

Weight: 2.3 lbs

Floor Mirror Gallery offers free shipping on all of our products!

We work very hard to ensure that we offer the absolute best prices online.  If you find another online store that offers a lower price then us within six months of your purchase date please let us know and we will refund your original payment for the difference.  We want you to feel confident that you are getting the absolute best price for the product you are ordering.  If you find that our own website has a lower price for the same item you have ordered within six months of your purchase date will refund the difference as well.

To request your partial refund simply e-mail us a link to the same product on our website, or on our competitors website within six months from the date of your order and we will process the credit accordingly.

Our 100% Price Guarantee has some limitations:

  • You must purchase the item from our website before requesting your Price Match Guarantee
  • Promotions such as rebates and buy one, get one free offers are not eligible
  • The item must be in stock on the competitors website
  • The competitor must be an online store, they may not have a retail location
  • The website can not be a discounter or auction website (ie; eBay, overstock, etc..)
  • The competitor must be an Authorized Retailer of the product in question
  • The Price Match Guarantee includes the item price and the shipping charges, it excludes sales tax
  • Certain brands are excluded: Brandt Works, Baxton Studios
Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out